Scientists have told, at what time most often a back pain

Health And Medical Video: How To Fix Lower Back Pain (Bro Science Versus Exercise Science) (December 2018).

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Australian scientists conducted a major study on the causes of back pain. They found that most often these pains arise between 7 am and noon, and fatigue or weight transfer increases their risk by three times.

Probably, every person during his life at least once faces back pain. At someone they pass and no longer remind themselves, but someone becomes chronic, especially in old age. Scientists from the George Institute for Global Health and the Sydney Medical School in Australia have determined that sudden back pain attacks occur most often between early morning and noon. The authors studied the causes of lower back pain in 999 patients over the age of 18 who visited different clinics. People were asked about what they were doing 4 days before the attack.

If they felt tired or moved something heavy, the risk of back pain increased three times. Load in an uncomfortable position increased the danger by 8 times, and if people were distracted during heavy loads (such as moving the cabinets), the risk of back pain increased by as much as 25 times. At the same time, having sex or using alcohol, as it turned out, is not associated with an additional risk of back pain.

According to the author of the study of Professor Manuel Ferrara, approximately 40% of all back pain occurs in the range from 8 to 11:00 am. Interestingly, in people over the age of 60, the risk of getting back pain is 5 times lower than in the 20-year-olds. This is probably due to the fact that older people already know how to safely perform such work.

"Our research shows that the cause of back pain is not a long-term effect on this part of the body," Professor Ferrara says. "Spine discs are filled with fluid throughout the night, so they become more vulnerable to loads during the first half of the day."

Scientists have told, at what time most often a back pain
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